AFGHANISTAN: NO PEACE FOR THE MEDIA

The Lockmat Times gives an overview of the situation after the Taliban crackdown on information.
The Lokmat Times gives an overview of the situation after the Taliban crackdown on the information.
Source

Since 28 March, the Taliban have banned the possibility of repeating foreign broadcasters’ programmes on Afghan territory. The first to stop broadcasting was the BBC, which asked for the decision to be revoked because programmes in Persian, Pashto and Uzbek are still only receivable by those with a satellite dish: 20% of the estimated six million listeners. Before the American withdrawal, the BBC also had dozens of FM installations in various parts of the country, including two in Kabul, on 89.0 and 101.6 MHz. The blockade makes no distinction and also affects the Voice of America, Deutsche Welle and the China Global Television Network.

Free speech in free fall

Published every year since 2002, the World Press Freedom Index is an important advocacy tool based on the principle of emulation between states
Published every year since 2002, the World Press Freedom Index is an important advocacy tool based on the principle of emulation between states
Source

According to a survey conducted by Reporters Without Borders (RSF) in collaboration with the Afghan Independent Journalists Association (AIJA), in four months (15 August to 20 December 2021), 231 media outlets ceased operations, putting more than 6,400 journalists out of work. And women are the hardest hit: four out of five have been ‘sent home’. And who knows how many positions Afghanistan will lose in the world press freedom rankings drawn up by the World Press Freedom Index, which measures press freedom in 180 countries around the world: in the 2021 report, Afghanistan was already in 122nd place.

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