MOLDOVA: Where analogue TV still holds sway

TeleRadio Moldova is the state broadcaster operating public radio and television
TeleRadio Moldova is the state broadcaster operating public radio and television. Radio Moldova was established in 1930 in the then Autonomous Soviet Socialist Republic of Moldova (RASSM), at that time part of Ukrainian territory.
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The small country sandwiched between Romania and Ukraine does not shine in terms of transparency and ease of circulation of radio and media news. The internal political situation is confused, the fact that Transnistria (with a Russian-speaking majority) is de facto independent (and has long since switched off all OIRT band installations) are other elements that do not help to easily decipher the situation.

The Romanian-language editorial staff of Radio Free Europe is part of Radio Free Europe-Radio Liberty (RFE/RL) and is funded by the US Congress.
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However, up to the end of 2020, some fifteen installations on the ‘old’ FM were in operation, both from public and private operators. These included Radio Free Europe (in local language), the station funded by the US Congress through the U.S. Agency for Global Media.

The photo on the website shows the headquarters of the Christian Charity Foundation Little Samaritan, an independent, non-profit organisation implementing humanitarian projects to help disadvantaged children, lonely elderly people and socially vulnerable families in the Republic of Moldova.
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If the news, although fragmentary, excludes the shutdown of the various stations (Radio Moldova Actualitati, Radio Micul Samaritean, Vocea Beserabiei and other smaller ones), some more concern is aroused by the situation of the three Radio Free Europe stations: in fact, the one operating on 69.53 has recently been reported switched off and this raises some questions. Is the shutdown temporary (due to a fault or something similar) or permanent? Will the other two RFE frequencies (68.48 and 70.31) soon be switched off too, or will they continue? However, the delicate political situation in the country (and in the area surrounding the Black Sea as a whole) means that even a partial shutdown of the station is unlikely.

Moldova 1 analogue TV received in 2020 in Bucharest
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And there are also lights on the analogue TV channels R2 and R3 (with the audio carrier, respectively, on 65.75 and 83.75 MHz) because the analogue-to-digital switch originally planned in 2015 has not yet been completed and it seems that the possible new end date is September 2021.

by Franco Martelli, part 3-continues

HUNGARY: Is democracy faltering? Radio Liberty arrives

Radio Liberty was founded in 1951 and merged with Radio Free Europe in 1975. Funded by the American Congress, the two radio stations were downsized at the end of the Cold War. The original Hungarian service, "Szabad Europa Radio", operated from Munich and was closed in 1993.
Radio Liberty was founded in 1951 and merged with Radio Free Europe in 1975. Funded by the American Congress, the two radio stations were downsized at the end of the Cold War. The original Hungarian service, “Szabad Europa Radio”, operated from Munich and was closed in 1993.
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After 27 years Radio Liberty returns to speak to Hungarian citizens: on 08th September 2020 it opened an editorial office in Budapest, given the political involution in the country. Premier Viktor Orbán has put more and more stress on democracy and has plunged Hungary into 89th place in the press freedom index produced by Reporters sans Frontières. But things are not simple: the American ambassador (President Donald Trump is in ideological harmony with Orbán) has asked the broadcaster (who declares not to be pressured) to be sympathetic to the Hungarian premier. More info here and here.

Belarus: Propaganda against Lukashenko is back on air

PR1, the first program of Polskie Radio, has been quick to change programming transmitted on long wave by broadcasting special news briefings about the situation following  the elections in Belarus
PR1, the first program of Polskie Radio, has been quick to change programming transmitted on long wave by broadcasting special news briefings about the situation following  the elections in Belarus
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In order to smother the protests after the rigged elections that reconfirmed Alexander Lukashenko as the President of Belarus for the sixth time, the regime has censored radio transmissions and they now only broadcast music and entertainment programmes. As a result, Poland has begun transmitting programmes in Belarusian (with three news broadcasts per day) from the long wave radio station, Solec Kujawski, that transmits on 225 kHz and, with its 1000 kW power, can be received all over Europe. In addition, Radio Liberty (financed by the United States Congress) has been reactivated on 1386 kHz from Viesintos, Lithuania. The transmitter was formerly used in Germany by the American Forces Network (the broadcast service for American troops) on 873 kHz. When transmissions from Weisskirchen (near Frankfurt) ceased in May 2013, the relatively new transmitter was mothballed and later taken to Lithuania. The portal Radios du Monde dedicated an article to this.